Hi, there! My name is Cecilia, and I study chemistry and planetary science. I love world-building in both the fictional and solar-system-history senses. I use this blog to gush about science and art mostly, so you'll see some of my own cartoons, poetry, and research here, as well as my favorite works from around the web.

Ask me anything, ESPECIALLY if it's about science. And thanks for stopping by!
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
NICE THOUGHTS CHALLENGE! ONCE YOU GET THIS YOU HAVE TO SAY 5 NICE THINGS ABOUT YOURSELF PUBLICLY AND SEND THIS TO 10 OF YOUR FAVOURITE FOLLOWERS

Oh no! I’m sorry I missed this before. How sweet!

Um ummm - ok here we go!

1. My hair is soft and curly like reddish/goldish/chocolate-colored pillow stuffing - makes an excellent cushion for napping, bounces when I walk, and catches the sunlight MAJESTICALLY.
2. My two front teeth have a gap that I used to be shy about… But now know for a SCIENCE FACT is both cute and memorable.
3. I am getting pretty good at drawing real people’s faces and gestures! (Send me a picture if you would like a stylized portrait of yourself or your favorite character!)
4. I am pretty good at writing poetry and rhyming lyrics… I like to think I would be a pretty good bard/keeper of earth’s cultural memory in the post-apocalypse. “Gather round, my children, and I shall sing you a song of Earth-That-Was: The Ballad of Nicki Minaj.”
5. I know lots of stuff about things! More specifically, I am super passionate about a variety of subjects - art, music, fashion, astronomy, geology, chemistry, microbiology, paleontology, etc. - and have spent a lot of time soaking up as much information as possible to fuel that passion. I am also super susceptible to other people’s passions - if you think something is rad and you tell me about it, I am going to think it’s rad and tell more people - so I am always excited about life and hungry to learn more things!

I’ll message my ten nominees privately!

Reblogged from athenagcsuti  12,131 notes

Nicki Minaj is not a woman who easily slides into the roles assigned to women in her industry or elsewhere. She’s not polished, she’s not concerned with her reputation, and she’s certainly not fighting for equality among mainstream second-wave feminists. She’s something else, and she’s something equally worth giving credence to: a boundary-breaker, a nasty bitch, a self-proclaimed queen, a self-determined and self-made artist. She’s one of the boys, and she does it with the intent to subvert what it means. She sings about sexy women, about fucking around with different men. She raps about racing ahead in the game, imagines up her own strings of accolades, and rolls with a rap family notorious for dirty rhymes, foul mouths, and disregard for authority and hegemony.

While Beyoncé has expanded feminist discourse by reveling in her role as a mother and wife while also fighting for women’s rights, Minaj has been showing her teeth in her climb to the top of a male-dominated genre. Both, in the process, have expanded our society’s idea of what an empowered women looks like — but Minaj’s feminist credentials still frequently come under fire. To me, it seems like a clear-cut case of respectability politics and mainstreaming of the feminist movement: while feminist writers raved over Beyoncé’s latest album and the undertones of sexuality and empowerment that came with it, many have questioned Minaj’s decisions over the years to subvert beauty norms using her own body, graphically talk dirty in her work, and occasionally declare herself dominant in discourse about other women. (All of these areas of concern, however, didn’t seem to come into play when Queen Bey did the same.)

By Nicki Minaj’s Feminism Isn’t About Your Comfort Zone: On “Anaconda” and Respectability Politics | Autostraddle (via becauseiamawoman)

R-E-S-P-E-C-T
find out what it means to me
R-E-S-P-E-C-T
take care, T-C-B

Reblogged from sciencetoastudent  95 notes
mindblowingscience:

Caltech Makes Famed Physicist’s ‘Feynman Lectures’ Available Online For Free

Caltech has made all three volumes of The Feynman Lectures On Physics, the celebrated textbook, available to read online for free.
The site was first launched in September of 2013, with only Volume I: Mainly mechanics, radiation, and heat at first. But now, as KPCC has pointed out, the other two volumes, Mainly electromagnetism and matter and Quantum mechanics have now been posted. The site is even optimized to look good on a mobile or tablet device. Get your learn on!
Richard P. Feynman, the Nobel laureate who was at Caltech from 1949 until the end of his life, is one of the most celebrated physicists and scientific minds of the 20th century. He would win the Nobel Prize in 1965 for his work in the field of quantum electrodynamics. Aside from his contributions to the world of physics, he also worked on the Manhattan Project and served on the commission that investigated the explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger.
His personality and enthusiasm made him a beloved figure, which helped to make the world of physics more accessible to the general population. He was known to ensure that students understood the material he was teaching, which earned him the nickname “The Great Explainer.”
The Feynman Lectures are based on lectures Feynman gave to undergrads at Caltech from 1961 to 1963 in order to serve as an updated and streamlined introductory course to physics in light the major advancements being made in the field. Because he only gave the lectures once, they were recorded and first published in three volumes in 1964.
The textbooks have been printed in a dozen languages, and the English copies alone have sold over 1.5 million copies. Sections of the Lectures have been condensed into the books Six Easy Pieces and Six Not So Easy Pieces, and audio CDs released of all 103 hours of lectures that Feynman gave.

mindblowingscience:

Caltech Makes Famed Physicist’s ‘Feynman Lectures’ Available Online For Free

Caltech has made all three volumes of The Feynman Lectures On Physics, the celebrated textbook, available to read online for free.

The site was first launched in September of 2013, with only Volume I: Mainly mechanics, radiation, and heat at first. But now, as KPCC has pointed out, the other two volumes, Mainly electromagnetism and matter and Quantum mechanics have now been posted. The site is even optimized to look good on a mobile or tablet device. Get your learn on!

Richard P. Feynman, the Nobel laureate who was at Caltech from 1949 until the end of his life, is one of the most celebrated physicists and scientific minds of the 20th century. He would win the Nobel Prize in 1965 for his work in the field of quantum electrodynamics. Aside from his contributions to the world of physics, he also worked on the Manhattan Project and served on the commission that investigated the explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger.

His personality and enthusiasm made him a beloved figure, which helped to make the world of physics more accessible to the general population. He was known to ensure that students understood the material he was teaching, which earned him the nickname “The Great Explainer.”

The Feynman Lectures are based on lectures Feynman gave to undergrads at Caltech from 1961 to 1963 in order to serve as an updated and streamlined introductory course to physics in light the major advancements being made in the field. Because he only gave the lectures once, they were recorded and first published in three volumes in 1964.

The textbooks have been printed in a dozen languages, and the English copies alone have sold over 1.5 million copies. Sections of the Lectures have been condensed into the books Six Easy Pieces and Six Not So Easy Pieces, and audio CDs released of all 103 hours of lectures that Feynman gave.