Hi, there! My name is Cecilia, and I study chemistry and planetary science. I love world-building in both the fictional and solar-system-history senses. I use this blog to gush about science and art mostly, so you'll see some of my own cartoons, poetry, and research here, as well as my favorite works from around the web.

Ask me anything, ESPECIALLY if it's about science. And thanks for stopping by!
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/

Let’s Talk About Movies:

Wes Anderson // Centered, A Visual Exploration of the Director’s Perfect Symmetry in Films (x)

"I have a way of filming things and staging them and designing sets. There were times when I thought I should change my approach, but in fact, this is what I like to do. It’s sort of like my handwriting as a movie director. And somewhere along the way, I think I’ve made the decision: I’m going to write in my own handwriting."

Reblogged from science666  40,174 notes

anthropologyadventures:

thejunglenook:

archiemcphee:

Here’s further proof that science and scientists are awesome:

A 7-year-old girl named Sophie wrote a lovely letter to the scientists at CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, politely asking if they could work on creating a dragon for her. She even included a drawing to help them out. (click here to read Sophie’s entire letter)

The scientists at CSIRO wrote back to Sophie:

We’ve been doing science since 1926 and we’re quite proud of what we have achieved. We’ve put polymer banknotes in your wallet, insect repellent on your limbs and Wi-Fi in your devices. But we’ve missed something. There are no dragons.

Over the past 87 odd years we have not been able to create a dragon or dragon eggs. We have sighted an eastern bearded dragon at one of our telescopes, observed dragonflies and even measured body temperatures of the mallee dragon. But our work has never ventured into dragons of the mythical, fire breathing variety. And for this Australia, we are sorry.

(click here to read the agency’s complete response)

But then something truly awesome happened. The scientists had a bit of a think, as scientists are wont to do, and decided to rapidly accelerate their Dragon R&D Program. That’s right, they made a dragon for Sophie - Toothless, a 3D printed titanium dragon, blue, female, species: Seadragonus giganticus maximus.

“Being that electron beams were used to 3D print her, we are certainly glad she didn’t come out breathing them … instead of fire,” said Chad Henry, our Additive Manufacturing Operations Manager. “Titanium is super strong and lightweight, so Toothless will be a very capable flyer.”

Toothless is currently en route from Lab 22 in Melbourne to Sophie’s home in Brisbane.

Now Sophie wants to work at CSIRO when she grows up.

Click here to watch a video of the creation of Sophie’s dragon.

[via Geeks are Sexy and Neatorama]

:3
Have you hugged a scientist today?

I hope that one day someone will address a letter to me as “Hello, Lovely Scientist.”  I also hope that one day I can inspire little girls to be empowered and get interested in science.  

Hello, lovely scientist
Reblogged from science666  42 notes

chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA

45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.

The resulting images are iconic. 

They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 

Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.

During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 

70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.

70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 

70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.

The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 

Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.

12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.

Reblogged from kateordie  170,776 notes

kateordie:

Dowling Duncan and redesigning the American Dollar:

Why the size?
We have kept the width the same as the existing dollars. However we have changed the size of the note so that the one dollar is shorter and the 100 dollar is the longest. When stacked on top of each other it is easy to see how much money you have. It also makes it easier for the visually impaired to distinguish between notes.

Why a vertical format?
When we researched how notes are used we realized people tend to handle and deal with money vertically rather than horizontally. You tend to hold a wallet or purse vertically when searching for notes. The majority of people hand over notes vertically when making purchases. All machines accept notes vertically. Therefore a vertical note makes more sense.

Why different colors?
It’s one of the strongest ways graphically to distinguish one note from another.

Why these designs?
We wanted a concept behind the imagery so that the image directly relates to the value of each note. We also wanted the notes to be educational, not only for those living in America but visitors as well. Each note uses a black and white image depicting a particular aspect of American history and culture. They are then overprinted with informational graphics or a pattern relating to that particular image.

$1 – The first African American president
$5 – The five biggest native American tribes
$10 – The bill of rights, the first 10 amendments to the US Constitution
$20 – 20th Century America
$50 – The 50 States of America
$100 – The first 100 days of President Franklin Roosevelt. During this time he led the congress to pass more important legislations than most presidents pass in their entire term. This helped fight the economic crises at the time of the great depression. Ever since, every new president has been judged on how well they have done during the first 100 days of their term.

I get so annoyed with Americans who make fun of Canadian currency because it’s “Monopoly Money.” What? Our currency is multicoloured, see-through, holographic and almost indestructible! I guess that’s not as cool as being impossible to tell apart, wrinkly, bland and super easy to rip?

These designs are slick as hell, though.

Neat!

Reblogged from thegodmedusa  37,135 notes
honestly curious, why does it offend you?
Anonymous

onlyblackbeauty:

perfectlyerik:

i see lucy as a racist film that plays on negative stereotypes while hiding behind the cover of (white) feminism. 

all this film has done is switch out the white man for a white woman. it’s still a film about a white person getting violated by the evil poc, then gaining power and wiping them out. 

here’s 2 of my favourite scenes from the trailer: 

image

from top to left to right:

KEEP CLEAN 保持清潔,APPLE 蘋果,ONION 洋蔥,GRAPE 葡萄,CHAIR 椅子,TOMATO 番茄

traditional chinese is an actual written language used by millions of people, not symbols to be thrown around at the whim of set designers because they look cool and idk, serves to create a menacing asian atmosphere. this is so disrespectful, and made even worse by the fact that this film in set it taipei, taiwan where the official written language is traditional chinese.

it doesn’t matter that this film caters to a primarily “white” audience who won’t be able to read it, the language and culture of taiwan isn’t something for you to twist and use as you deem fit because it’s “exotic.” 

image

lucy shoots a guy for not being able to speak english. 

she l i t e r a l l y shoots this taiwanese taxi driver, in taiwan for not being able to speak english. she’s in taipei and she’s shooting people as they are of no use to her because they don’t speak english. 

just think about the sort of message that’s sending out. she’s not being “bad-ass strong female character who takes no shit,” she’s saying that english is useful and better. this is the type of harmful ideology that stretches all the way back from when western countries were colonising and forcing their language and customs on other countries. 

let me explain with a real life example. i was born in new zealand to two taiwanese parents. i am fluent in english, but mandarin is conversational at best. my friends in taiwan say that i am “so lucky” to speak fluent english, when they are fluent in mandarin and their english level is no worse than my mandarin. they tell me that they want to perfect their english but in the same breath tell me that mandarin isn’t worth perfecting because i have english and that’s “enough”. they also tell me how pretty my white friends are when they see pictures.

this is the type of neo imperialism ideology that they’ve grown up buying into. it honestly hurts and frustrates me that they belittle their own culture like this, honestly believing that the western world is superior. this is the type of neo imperialism ideology that this film (hopefully unintentionally) promotes: white people are better and will save the day. 

if they wanted to film a movie about a white women getting back at those who had violated her, why not film it in a western country? if they wanted to film it in taiwan, why not find an asian lead actress?

i do agree that we need more women protagonists in action/superhero movies, but not like this. its not okay that the female lead needs to be kidnapped and have her body cut open without her consent in order to gain her powers, and those said those powers do not make any of this racist bullshit okay. 

i am just so tired and angry of poc always being brushed off to the side as either props or villains in mainstream media. 

as a poc, it’s so frustrating to see that the of the standard of beauty still white women when we live in multi-cultural societies and a diverse world. 

feminism is about equality. a film in which poc are presented as evil and inferior before being killed off by a superior white woman does not promote equality. 

THIS.

Critical. As neat as it sounded to have a genius lady protagonist, every ad I see makes me so uncomfortable and disappointed.